Comments for Simple thoughts http://x-ian.net #{programming} || #{mountains} Sun, 09 Dec 2012 12:51:42 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Comment on Making your EMR work in resource-poor settings by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2012/10/21/making-your-emr-work-in-resource-poor-settings/#comment-816 x-ian Sun, 09 Dec 2012 12:51:42 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=315#comment-816 Additional remarks: - admitting failure ('failure report') - shut up and listen (and observe!) - donor driven instead of driven by beneficiaries - 'whatever it takes' is one problem Additional remarks:
- admitting failure (‘failure report’)
- shut up and listen (and observe!)
- donor driven instead of driven by beneficiaries
- ‘whatever it takes’ is one problem

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Comment on WiFi Performance FAQ by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2011/04/18/wifi-performance-faq/#comment-799 x-ian Sun, 24 Jul 2011 09:11:56 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=271#comment-799 Bluetooth Interference Bluetooth use FHSS (frequency-hopping spread spectrum) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency-hopping_spread_spectrum as an AFH (adaptive frequency hopping) technology to ensure that anti-interference robustness in the 2.4 Hz band. All the 79.1 channel with each 1 Mhz hopping 1,600 times per second. Bluetooth Interference

Bluetooth use FHSS (frequency-hopping spread spectrum) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency-hopping_spread_spectrum as an AFH (adaptive frequency hopping) technology to ensure that anti-interference robustness in the 2.4 Hz band. All the 79.1 channel with each 1 Mhz hopping 1,600 times per second.

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Comment on WiFi Performance FAQ by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2011/04/18/wifi-performance-faq/#comment-798 x-ian Sun, 24 Jul 2011 09:10:55 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=271#comment-798 Interference Wi-Fi 11b uses Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct-sequence_spread_spectrum). Its carrier does not hop or change frequency and remains centered on one channel that is 22 MHz-wide. While there is room for 11 overlapping channels in this 83 MHz-wide band, there is only room for three non-overlapping channels. Thus there can be no more than three different Wi-Fi networks operating in close proximity to one another." WiFi 11g uses OFDM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OFDM) for 54 Mbps and DSSS for 11 Mbps and is designed to reduce interference. Question: If 11g falls back to speed 11 Mpbs and below, does it also move back to DSSS? Interference

Wi-Fi 11b uses Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct-sequence_spread_spectrum). Its carrier does not hop or change frequency and remains centered on one channel that is 22 MHz-wide. While there is room for 11 overlapping channels in this 83 MHz-wide band, there is only room for three non-overlapping channels. Thus there can be no more than three different Wi-Fi networks operating in close proximity to one another.”

WiFi 11g uses OFDM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OFDM) for 54 Mbps and DSSS for 11 Mbps and is designed to reduce interference.

Question: If 11g falls back to speed 11 Mpbs and below, does it also move back to DSSS?

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Comment on WiFi Performance FAQ by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2011/04/18/wifi-performance-faq/#comment-797 x-ian Mon, 16 May 2011 06:33:25 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=271#comment-797 Order of WiFi signals to connect to Looks like most Operating Systems treat the latest configured WiFi network with the highest priority. This means that it tries to connect to WiFi networks in reverse order of it's first configuration; not necessarily to the ones with best signals strength/coverage. When having a few high power/long distance antennas and multiple local Access Point could lead to the point where even though a local Access Point with good signal is available, the system tries to connect to the low speed (due to above reasons), weak signal long distance antennas. Align the order to the ones with the most local signal first. Order of WiFi signals to connect to

Looks like most Operating Systems treat the latest configured WiFi network with the highest priority. This means that it tries to connect to WiFi networks in reverse order of it’s first configuration; not necessarily to the ones with best signals strength/coverage. When having a few high power/long distance antennas and multiple local Access Point could lead to the point where even though a local Access Point with good signal is available, the system tries to connect to the low speed (due to above reasons), weak signal long distance antennas. Align the order to the ones with the most local signal first.

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Comment on WiFi Performance FAQ by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2011/04/18/wifi-performance-faq/#comment-796 x-ian Wed, 11 May 2011 15:48:43 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=271#comment-796 What impact has the Polarization? Seems like usually V-Pol (vertical polarization) is used. Although I could find some talk about H-Pol (horizontal polarization) for high density areas. For Point-to-Point you can use both as long as both endpoints are configured the same way. For a forest area between the links, H-Pol may work slightly better. What impact has the Polarization?

Seems like usually V-Pol (vertical polarization) is used. Although I could find some talk about H-Pol (horizontal polarization) for high density areas. For Point-to-Point you can use both as long as both endpoints are configured the same way. For a forest area between the links, H-Pol may work slightly better.

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Comment on Testing Webapps with multiple browsers by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2009/05/13/testing-webapps-with-multiple-browsers/#comment-429 x-ian Thu, 21 Jan 2010 15:31:28 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=87#comment-429 maybe https://browserlab.adobe.com/index.html is worth a try too... maybe https://browserlab.adobe.com/index.html is worth a try too…

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Comment on Outlook-iPhone birthday synchronisation by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2009/05/30/outlook-iphone-birthday-synchronisation/#comment-556 x-ian Sat, 30 May 2009 19:56:12 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=94#comment-556 And just another hint. Maybe you want to use Outlook for your calendar stuff, but not really as your mail program. Not a really good thing to do as Windows allows only to set one mail program system-wide via the MAPI interface. So one for all users and all purposes. Give DefaultMail (http://windowsxp.mvps.org/defaultmail.htm) a try as this at least has a convenient way to change the MAPI default and introduces a per-user default MAPI policy. And just another hint. Maybe you want to use Outlook for your calendar stuff, but not really as your mail program.

Not a really good thing to do as Windows allows only to set one mail program system-wide via the MAPI interface. So one for all users and all purposes.

Give DefaultMail (http://windowsxp.mvps.org/defaultmail.htm) a try as this at least has a convenient way to change the MAPI default and introduces a per-user default MAPI policy.

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Comment on Outlook-iPhone birthday synchronisation by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2009/05/30/outlook-iphone-birthday-synchronisation/#comment-555 x-ian Sat, 30 May 2009 19:04:29 +0000 http://x-ian.net/?p=94#comment-555 BTW: Sometimes my birthday entries in the calendar are going from 23:00 one day before the birthday up to 23:00 at the birthday (instead of occupying just the whole day). Why is it like that? - Timezone? - Daylight saving time? - 42? BTW: Sometimes my birthday entries in the calendar are going from 23:00 one day before the birthday up to 23:00 at the birthday (instead of occupying just the whole day). Why is it like that?
- Timezone?
- Daylight saving time?
- 42?

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Comment on It’s about to start by x-ian http://x-ian.net/2009/04/18/its-about-to-start/#comment-194 x-ian Fri, 01 May 2009 16:35:18 +0000 http://x-ian.firstprinciplesmanagement.de/?p=3#comment-194 ...lonely comment... …lonely comment…

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